Reblog: from 7minutes.net

Reblog: from 7minutes.net

Frankly, I often find articles that state views better than I could. Rather than try to put the thoughts out there “in my own words,” I’m just going to reblog them.

It’s a quicker, easier way to keep the post-a-day streak on track.

And by the way, a pet peeve of mine is commentators (usually sports guys) who misuse the phrases “on track and untracked.” On track is good. Untracked is bad.  Like a train.

So, for my post today, I came across 7minutes.net’s “One Thing” post when I did a search for “Bible focus on one thing.”

Last night, I watched the season finale of “Knightfall” and the “extras” (short vids about the history of the Templars) available with it. This morning I got to thinking how, in another life, I might have been a historian – except for my inability to focus occupationally on just “one thing.”

reblogSo the first reblog is What’s the one thing the Bible says is important?
“Search the Bible for ‘one thing,’ and only 5 verses appear.”

Second, after poking around the site, I found Tim Farron’s resignation – Christians are now the heretics. The key phrase from this article that caught my attention is “As Christians, we need to learn to express our values and beliefs … with some humility, ‘more testimonial than dictatorial.'”

Thanks to mageewp.com for the Reblog image.

 

 

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‘Tapping’ into “It’s Not About the Nail;” Everything or Nothing

‘Tapping’ into “It’s Not About the Nail;” Everything or Nothing

It’s Not About the Nail

Screenshot 2017-10-13 04.31.46

A few years ago, this video, “It’s Not About the Nail,” surfaced on YouTube. I find it amusing.

Screenshot 2017-10-13 05.29.37
It depicts a supposed difference between men and women: that women like to (or need to) just talk about problems and issues (like going on about a nail stuck in your forehead), while men just want to “fix” it.

small crossBut this morning, I realized that it summarizes another, non-gender relationship; the one between God (the Creator) and humans (the Created).

(And I also recognize another symbolism in a nail being the physical object.)

Continue reading “‘Tapping’ into “It’s Not About the Nail;” Everything or Nothing”

A Modern Martha and Mary

A Modern Martha and Mary

Do you know the Bible story of Martha and Mary?

IMG_2989Jesus visited the home of two sisters. He sat and taught – doing His thing. Mary chose to “sit at his feet and listen.” Martha busied herself tidying and preparing – complaining about no one helping.

Who was right – or acted in a better way? Here’s my modern take on the lesson of this tale.

First off, the characters in this drama today would be Marty and Mary, or Martha and Mark, or Marty and Mark. The teaching applies to everyone, anyone.

IMG_3273Historically,  it was more notable – almost shocking in the 1st century – for the actors to be women. Jesus was emphasizing the discipleship of all people.

Second, neither sibling was doing wrong. Both were ‘working’ at good things, learning and providing food. Jesus simply pointed out that food for thought was the more important at this time.

I mean, how often do you have The Messiah in your house?

IMG_3189Third, it’s the attitude, not the activity, that Jesus was trying to stress. It was perfectly fine for Martha to get dinner together. Her lack was in speaking out against what her sister desired in that moment.

A righteous evening would have gone like this:

I imagine how my extended family gathers for special-Sunday dinners like Easter or someone’s birthday. Let’s say Jesus shows up.

IMG_3188We’d be at my brother-and-sister-in-laws’ house. It’s always immaculate, no pre-cleaning needed. Dan is into hospitality and cooking, so the appetizers would already be out and there’d be plenty of time to socialize. The main course would almost be ready.

Jesus might speak now or just meet the folks and impress with how much He knows about us, hosts included.

IMG_3290Eventually, it’d be time. Everyone would help swap in the dinner dishes, and we’d pick our spots.  Good food and some light conversation would be served.

As the eating winds down, the serious talking builds up. Again, it’s all hands clearing the table (or as many can fit in the not-overly-large kitchen).

We then play a sort of social musical chairs, switching every now and then to catch up with everyone. There’d be dessert. Yum.

IMG_3279.JPGI can hear Jesus gradually getting the whole group’s attention. He’d’ve grabbed the spinny chair that’s right in between the dining and sitting halves of the room. He’d slowly turn every now and then, catching eyes intently.

After a while, His voice would be the only sound, into the wee hours…